Welcome to Girouard Vines Brands Contact | 918.231.4592 | jan@tulsawine.com |

Thank you Tulsa World

Sangria Class at Girouard Vines

Beat the Heat with Fruity Sangria

By JESSICA RODRIGO World Scene Writer

Nothing compares to a sip of ice-cold sangria on a hot day.

It’s also a quick drink to make for entertaining on the fly, said Melanie Burns, owner of Sidebar Liquid Catering. The mixologist for hire added that making sangria is a fun way to experiment with drinks and get a sneak-peek into making cocktails.

“There are a million recipes and a million ways to do it,” she said.

Most people immediately think of the red wines when they think of sangria — a wine-based drink infused with fruits, herbs and alcohol — but she also blends whites and rosés. It can be customized to anyone’s palate and can be made with whichever wines and fruit are preferred.

Burns likes to use what’s available in the produce section of her grocery store or at area farmers markets. That might include blueberries, strawberries, apples or peaches as well as herbs and spices.

“There is no rule when you’re going to put fruit in your wine. It’s very forgiving,” she explained.

She creates her recipes based on fruit that she enjoys eating and fruit that will pair well with the wines she uses including a merlot, sauvignon blanc and rosé.

Burns, who teaches a sangria blending class with Girouard Vines, recommends using wines that people are familiar with and might drink regularly. But she doesn’t believe using a cheap wine is the way to make a good sangria.

“Don’t use a use a cheap wine. I can tell you that if you make a margarita with a cheap tequila, it will taste like a cheap margarita,” she said. The same goes with making sangria. “Go with a wine that you like.”

She also warns that if you use lower quality wine, you might have to do more adjusting with fruit and toppers. Choosing a particular kind of wine will also dictate how much or how little sugar you’ll add later if the fruit isn’t sweet enough — another reason to choose fruit that is in season. Riesling and Pinot grigio are sweeter so they won’t need as much help, and red wines can add an level of depth to the end product.

Making sangria is pretty simple, but some people are scared of it, Burns said. Though she knows her recipes include a lot of ingredients, it’s a set-it and forget-it technique. She prepares it all at one time and then lets the magic happen in the fridge when it’s chilling.

“When you take the time to make something, you don’t want to be done with it and then be unhappy. If you do it right the first time, then making it every time after that will be a good experience,” she said.

Taste the fruit while you’re cutting it and sample it with the wine, too, this will give you a good idea of what your end product will be when it comes out of the refrigerator after a few hours.

Tips and tricks

Make more than you need - If you're going to go through the trouble of dicing the fruit and letting it set for a few hours, set extra aside to put in the freezer for another day. Strain the fruit after a few hours and added water from the juice and toppers will help it freeze.

Serve it over ice - Sangria is best served cold. After it's been blended, pour the finished product over ice in wine glasses with fresh cut fruit. Fresh-cut fruit will look prettier than the fruit that has been soaking in the wine, that's why she recommends straining the fruit before serving it.

Don't let it marinate too long - Avoid letting the fruit marinate for longer than six hours, Burns said. The rinds of oranges and lemons will make the wine taste bitter if they're left to sit too long.

Experiment with flavors - Fresh herbs and spices, such as mint and cinnamon, add a great taste to sangrias. Choose ingredients according to the season: Mint and basil would be refreshing in a white sangria served in the heat of summer while cinnamon and cloves would go well in a red sangria in December.

 

RED SANGRIA

1½ bottles merlot, chilled (recommended Tulsa Deco Spotlight Merlot)

1 cinnamon stick

3-4 blackberries

½ lemon, sliced

2 ounces ginger simple syrup

½ orange, sliced

Handful of black seedless grapes,

3 ounces peach nectar

5 ounces tropical Italian soda

8 ounces fresh blood orange or grapefruit juice

5 ounces grapefruit San Pellegrino

5 ounces prickly pair San Pellegrino

¼ cup Lillet French wine or brandy

1. In a large container or pitcher, combine all ingredients.

2. Allow the wine and fruit to infuse 4-6 hours, but not overnight (the peels will add a bitter flavor to the sangria).

3. When ready to serve, strain the fruit add fresh-cut fruit to each glass with ice. Pour sangria over ice and fruit.

— Recipe courtesy of Melanie Burns, Sidebar Liquid Catering

WHITE SANGRIA

1½ bottles Sauvignon blanc, chilled (recommended Tulsa Deco Warehouse Market)

Sprig of fresh rosemary or basil

½ green apple, sliced

3-4 large strawberries, whole

4-5 raspberries, whole

5-4 blueberries, whole

½ pear, sliced

½ orange, sliced

2 ounce simple syrup

3 ounces Kern’s peach nectar

5 ounces lemon San Pellegrino

5 ounces tropical soda

12 ounces Martinelli’s sparkling cider

¼ cup light rum, sherry or St. Germaine (could be a little of all three)

1. Lightly bruise or muddle herbs in the bottom of a large container or pitcher to release the aromatics and oils.

2. Add prepared fruit, wine and toppers to container.

2. Allow the wine and fruit to infuse 4-6 hours, but not overnight (the peels will add a bitter flavor to the sangria).

3. When ready to serve, strain the fruit add fresh-cut fruit to each glass with ice. Pour sangria over ice and fruit. Use fresh herbs as garnish.

— Recipe courtesy of Melanie Burns, Sidebar Liquid Catering

ROSE SANGRIA

1½ bottles of rosé wine, chilled

A fresh leaves of mint or sage, lightly bruised

5 red cherries, whole

4 large strawberries, whole

½ lemon, sliced

½ Fuji apple, sliced

½ orange, sliced

1 plum, if in season

½ pear, sliced

Handful of blueberries, about ¾ cup

1 kiwi, skinned and sliced

Handful of raspberries, about ¾ cup

2 ounces simple syrup

12 ounces white cranberry juice

3 ounce Kern’s peach nectar

5 ounces ginger ale

5 ounces lemon San Pellegrino

¼ cup brandy, lillet rosé or Cointreau

1. Lightly bruise or muddle herbs in the bottom of a large container or pitcher to release the aromatics and oils.

2. Add prepared fruit, wine and toppers to container.

2. Allow the wine and fruit to infuse 4-6 hours, but not overnight (the peels will add a bitter flavor to the sangria).

3. When ready to serve, strain the fruit add fresh-cut fruit to each glass with ice. Pour sangria over ice and fruit. Use fresh herbs as garnish.

— Recipe courtesy of Melanie Burns, Sidebar Liquid Catering

FIVE-INGREDIENT SANGRIA

2 bottles of the wine of your choice

2-3 fruits of your choice, chopped

12 ounces topper of your choice, sparkling water, soda or juice

¼-½ cup Brandy, optional

1. Combine fruit and wine, and brandy if using, in a container for a few hours in a refrigerator to chill.

2. When ready to serve, add topper to pitcher and mix. Pour over ice in wine glass.

0 comments

Leave a comment

All comments need to be approved by the shop owner.

Back to Top